In show of unity, Lebanese form longest human chain

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The line quickly connected from Tripoli to Sour. Organizers made sure to move volunteers from one area to another to complete the chain.

by Sally Farhat -Source: Annahar

BEIRUT: From its far North to its far South, Lebanon witnessed the formation of the longest human chain. A record breaker? Maybe. Nonetheless, the goal was not to enter Guinness World Record, but rather to show the strength of unity of the Lebanese protesters and their insistence on their demands.

“This human chain represents a breath of hope for the Lebanese,” Vivianne Freiha, one of the protesters, said.

Souraya Tabet, another protester that has joined in forming the chain, told Annahar that “this initiative is a symbolic representation of people’s unity, which everyone has been seeing among protesters since day one. We will make it, hand in hand.”

The line quickly connected from Tripoli to Sour. Organizers made sure to move volunteers from one area to another to complete the chain. This was the case in Jal el-Dib, where protesters were asked to move to Dbayeh.

“200,000 people are expected to join us today to form the human chain,” Muriel Aboulrous, one of the Beirut organizers, explained to Annahar. “We have around 40 meeting points along Lebanon’s coastal from Tripoli to Sour.”

Aya Fakih, a mom of two, knew about the human chain from a Facebook post and immediately felt an obligation to join with her children in Martyrs Square.

“This human chain is very important, it teaches our children the importance of holding hands and moving forward as a team. It’s the most peaceful and human way to tell the world that no matter how much they will try to break us, we will remain united,” Fakih said.

Hussam Shbaro, a pharmacy student at the Lebanese University, heard about the initiative from his friends and ultimately, decided to join.

“I think it’s one of the greatest ways to show politicians that we’re stronger than they will ever be. We’re holding hands with people from places we’ve never heard of, from different religions, sects, and backgrounds. We’re all here for one goal.”

Sunday marked the 11th day of Lebanon’s demonstrations. Protesters have rejected the proposed government reforms, asking for the resignation of the government, early elections, and the formation of a technocrat government.

Christy-Belle Geha, Chiri Choukeir, and TK Maloy contributed to this article. 

 

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