The Right Way to Take Melatonin Supplements For Sleep

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Close-Up of White Melatonin Natural Medicine Sleeping Pills on Green Background

By Kathleen Mulpeter / Health.com – Time

Jet lag always seems to get the best of me when I travel. I’ve tried prescription sleeping pills, well-timed cups of coffee, and even gradually adjusting my sleep schedule in the days leading up to a trip. But I hadn’t used melatonin to help regulate my sleep cycle, so when Sundown Naturals Adult Melatonin Gummies ($10; amazon.com) landed on my desk a few days before a recent trip to Europe, it seemed like fate. I packed a handful in my carry-on, thinking at the very least they’d help me get a few hours of shuteye during the flight. That’s when my love affair began: Unlike sleeping pills, melatonin helped me drift off to sleep easily on the plane, yet didn’t leave me feeling groggy upon arrival. I ended up taking them every night during the trip to help my body clock adjust to the new time zone (with minimal jet lag!); and then, back in New York, to ease into Eastern Time again.

But two weeks later—definitely no longer jet lagged—I still find myself reaching for these gummies before bed. For me, it’s less about falling asleep and more about the quality of my rest. I’ve been snoozing soundly throughout the night and waking up feeling super-refreshed. But is that how you’re supposed to use melatonin? And even though it’s a natural sleep aid, is it possible to become addicted?

The right way to take melatonin

I reached out to Chris Winter, MD, medical director of the Martha Jefferson Hospital Sleep Medicine Center and author of the upcoming book The Sleep Solution, to get his take. The good news, he says, is you won’t become physically addicted to melatonin supplements—at least not in the way you can get addicted to prescription sleeping pills, for example. But that doesn’t mean you should make a nightly habit out of taking them.

“You should give yourself a time limit, such as for four or five days,” he says, adding that they should be taken for a very specific reason, such as during an unusual bout of insomnia or when you’re traveling across time zones. “When that thing has run its course, you should stop.”

The reason for this, Dr. Winter explains, has to do with the way our body’s internal clock functions. When the sun sets and it gets dark outside, this alerts the brain’s pineal gland that it’s almost time to go to sleep. The pineal gland, in turn, begins to secrete melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate the sleep-wake cycle. The next morning, melatonin levels drop, signaling to your body that it’s time to wake up.

 

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